Dodd-Frank’s continuing Legacy

It is now five years since President Obama signed the Dodd-Frank Act, continuing the work begun by the bank bailouts of 2008-2009 –

which critics argue includes putting the squeeze on small banks and the small- and medium-sized firms that used to rely on them.

“Dodd-Frank’s backers in Congress and other members of the left touted the regulation as a means of helping Main Street over Wall Street,” writes Carrie Sheffield in Forbes
“Yet the number of community banks fell by 40 percent since 1994, and their share of U.S. banking assets fell by more than half – from 41 percent to 18 percent.

“In contrast, the biggest banks saw their share of assets rise from 18 percent to 46 percent. And while the number of community banks already declined before the crisis, since the second quarter of 2010 – Dodd-Frank’s passage – community banks have lost market share at a rate double what they did between Q2 2006 and Q2 2010: 12 percent vs. 6 percent.”

Dodd-Frank’s regulatory burdens, another critic argues, “are driving consolidation, and could result in lending markets less able to serve core economic demands.” Particularly troubling, according to lead author Marshall Lux, a senior fellow at HKS’s Mossavar-Rahmani Center for Business and Government and senior advisor at The Boston Consulting Group, “is community banks’ declining market share in several key lending markets, their decline in small business lending volume, and the disproportionate losses being realized by particularly small community banks.”

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